Interview with Jon Corbett

Introduction Jon Corbett is an artist programmer of Métis (Cree+Saulteaux+English) heritage who has taken on the challenge of adapting and expressing elements of his cultural heritage and indigenous Cree language in computer code. Exploring what he and others have called “indigenous programming” practices (Corbett, Laiti, Lewis, and Temkin 2020),1 Corbett has been developing software in …

Dance Becoming Data Part Two: Conversation Between Anton Koch and Scott delaHunta

September 2017 In early 2014, the first funded phase of Motion Bank came to a close with the publication of the so called on-line scores of the guest choreographers Deborah Hay, Jonathan Burrows/ Matteo Fargion, Thomas Hauert and Bebe Miller. Planning immediately commenced to continue the project, but with a more visible focus on creative …

Dance Becoming Data: Part One Software for Dancers

The starting point for this contribution to the special section of Computational Culture on Computing the Corporeal is a relatively small cluster of research projects starting in 2000, which explored various roles that software and software development might play in the context of contemporary dance creation and performance. The inaugural project for which four choreographers, …

Field Report for Critical Code Studies, 2014


Field Report for Critical Code Studies, 2014 Over the past seven years since the publication of the manifesto on Critical Code Studies (CCS), 1 the early explorers have established that examining code using humanities-style interpretive methodologies is a valuable part of the analysis of software and programming culture and have shown the first signs of …

Die Aufklärung in the Age of Philosophical Engineering

The public access to the web is twenty years old. Through it, digital society has developed throughout the entire world. But has this society become mündig, that is, mature, in the sense that Immanuel Kant used this term to define the age of Enlightenment as an exit from minority, from Unmündigkeit? Certainly not: contemporary society …